Lack Of Nothing

Lack Of Nothing

by Pastor Ricky Kurth
Printer Friendly Version

Share Article:   

A Simple Lesson in Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth

“…he that gathered little had no lack…” (Ex. 16:18).

“Neither was there any among them that lacked…” (Acts 4:34).

“…that ye may have lack of nothing” (I Thes. 4:11,12).

As we can see here, throughout the Bible, God has been concerned that His people do not lack for the basic necessities of “food and raiment” (I Tim. 6:8). However, as we shall see, the means by which He provides for these necessities has changed. To begin with, when the manna fell in the wilderness, Moses told Israel:

“…Gather of it every man according to his eating… And the children of Israel did so, and gathered, some more, some less… he that gathered much had nothing over, and he that gathered little had no lack…” (Ex. 16:16-18).

Here we see that God miraculously provided daily bread for Israel during their wilderness journey, and they “lacked nothing” (Deut. 2:7). We know He also supernaturally prevented their shoes and clothing from wearing out during those forty years (Deut. 29:5). But as we turn to the New Testament, we find that the means by which God provided for the needs of His people changed. At Pentecost, we read,

“And all that believed were together, and had all things common; And sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need” (Acts 2:44,45).

“Neither was there any among them that lacked; for as many as were possessors of lands or houses sold them, and brought the prices of the things that were sold, And laid them down at the apostles’ feet; and distribution was made unto every man according as he had need” (Acts 4:34,35).

As you can see, the means by which God provided for His people changed dramatically. Here He provided their needs by instructing them to pool their resources and live in a communal state.

Today in the dispensation of Grace, the means by which He supplies our needs has changed yet again. Our Apostle Paul tells us:

“And that ye study to be quiet, and to do your own business, and to work with your own hands, as we have commanded you; That ye may walk honestly toward them that are without, and that ye may have lack of nothing” (I Thes. 4:11,12).

Once more we see that the means by which God provides His people with the necessities of life has changed. Today a Christian’s needs are met by God as he goes about “working with his hands the thing which is good” (Eph. 4:28).

And so we are reminded anew that while God Himself never changes, the way in which He deals with men has changed dispensationally throughout the ages.


Share Article:   

To the Reader:
Some of our Two Minutes articles were written many years ago. Rather than rewrite or date such articles, we have left them just as they were when first published. This, we felt, would add to the interest, especially since our readers understand that many of them first appeared as newspaper articles. We hope that you’ll agree that while some of the references in these articles are dated, the spiritual truths taught therein are timeless.

Advertisements

In His Service

In His Service

by Pastor Paul M. Sadler
Printer Friendly Version

Share Article:   

Scripture Reading:

“I beseech you therefore, brethren, by the mercies of God, that ye present your bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is your reasonable service. And be not conformed to this world: but be ye transformed by the renewing of your mind, that ye may prove what is that good, and acceptable, and perfect, will of God.” — Romans 12:1,2

At all times we should stand ready to serve the Lord in whatever capacity He has called us. Time is precious! Isaac Watts once said: “Time, like an ever-rolling stream, bears all its sons away.” Unlike eternity, everything in this life has a beginning and an end, as Solomon reminds us:

“To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven: A time to be born, and a time to die” (Eccl. 3:1,2).

In the natural course of things, life and death are in God’s control. But what takes place between these two monumental events will have a bearing upon us throughout eternity. Life is the dash that appears between the dates on every tombstone. And that little dash speaks volumes. For some it marks a conversion to Christ and all the spiritual benefits that come with it. But for others it is a chronicle of rejection and rebellion against God, with no hope of reprieve. Which is true of you? If the latter, there’s still time to trust Christ and flee the wrath to come.

The question is, what will we do with the remaining time that’s left before our dash is etched in stone? Paul says, “Brethren, I count not myself to have apprehended: but this one thing I do, forgetting those things which are behind, and reaching forth unto those things which are before, I press toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus” (Phil. 3:13,14).

This passage has always amazed me. After 30 plus years of serving the Lord, Paul was still pressing toward the goal. He refused to allow the past to influence his life — whether it was past failures or accomplishments. God has done a wonderful work here at BBS through the years, but we must not dwell upon past accomplishments or failures.

Like Paul, we must press forward toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God.

May it be our desire that we might “know Christ,” that is, more fully, and experience the power of His resurrection. There is still much to be done, but with your help, we can leave a legacy of grace that will be long remembered after we lie in the dust of the earth.


Share Article:   

To the Reader:
Some of our Two Minutes articles were written many years ago. Rather than rewrite or date such articles, we have left them just as they were when first published. This, we felt, would add to the interest, especially since our readers understand that many of them first appeared as newspaper articles. We hope that you’ll agree that while some of the references in these articles are dated, the spiritual truths taught therein are timeless.

The Counsel Of Kindness

The Counsel Of Kindness

by Pastor Ricky Kurth
Printer Friendly Version

Share Article:   

“And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you” (Eph.4:32).

While probably everyone has an idea of what it means to be kind, the precise definition of kindness might surprise you! Let’s begin by seeing how the Bible defines this word, as we compare Scripture with Scripture:

In II Chronicles 10, Rehoboam had just inherited the throne of Israel upon the death of his father Solomon (9:29-31). When the people asked if he would ease the financial burden that his father had placed upon them (10:1-5), Rehoboam “took counsel with the old men that had stood before Solomon” (v. 6). These elders wisely replied,

“If thou be kind to this people, and please them, and speak good words to them, they will be thy servants for ever” (v. 7).

However, the parallel passage in I Kings 12 records their words differently:

“If thou wilt be a servant unto this people this day, and wilt serve them, and answer them, and speak good words to them, then they will be thy servants for ever” (v. 7).

Far from a discrepancy, this variation in what these men were heard to say that day is God’s way of defining kindness. To be kind to a man means to be a servant to him. This agrees with Webster’s definition of the word “kind”: “Disposed to do good to others, and to make them happy by granting their requests, supplying their wants…,” etc.

How important is kindness? When Rehoboam “forsook the counsel of the old men” (I Kings 12:8), and determined to be more unkind than his father ever dreamed of being (vv. 14,15), “Israel rebelled against the house of David” (v. 19). This was the beginning of the great division in the twelve tribes of Israel, as Jeroboam led ten of the tribes in revolt away from the house of David, driving a wedge between the ten tribes of Israel and the two tribes of Judah (I Kings 12:20-33). In other words, millions of people were divided for a thousand years—all for the lack of a little kindness!

In closing, while your lack of kindness is not likely to have that kind of monumental effect in the world, it will affect someone. Why not rather decide right now to be Pauline in practice as well as in doctrine, and “be ye kind one to another!”


Share Article:   

To the Reader:
Some of our Two Minutes articles were written many years ago. Rather than rewrite or date such articles, we have left them just as they were when first published. This, we felt, would add to the interest, especially since our readers understand that many of them first appeared as newspaper articles. We hope that you’ll agree that while some of the references in these articles are dated, the spiritual truths taught therein are timeless.

A Gift For You

A Gift For You

by Pastor Cornelius R. Stam
Printer Friendly Version

Share Article:   

“For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish, but have everlasting life” (John 3:16).

In the light of the Pauline epistles these well-known words have become more appropriate than when our Lord first spoke them. Through Paul, Christ’s redemptive work at Calvary has been proclaimed and fully explained. In this light, then, we suggest that our readers take the time to really meditate on this passage about God’s greatest gift to man.

Think of the love that prompted it! “God so loved….” We were the “children of disobedience” and “by nature the children of wrath, even as others” (Eph. 2:2,3). We deserved judgment, “but God, who is rich in mercy, for His great love wherewith He loved us,” gave His best, His all, to save us (Eph. 2:4).

Think of its priceless value! “His only begotten Son — everlasting life.” Christ, the holy One, had to be given up to disgrace and death in order that our sins might be justly dealt with, and that we might become the rightful heirs of everlasting life (Rom. 3:25,26).

Think of your need of this gift! “…that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish….” How perilous not to accept “the gift of God, eternal life, through Jesus Christ our Lord” (Rom. 6:23)! What folly to spurn or ignore a gift we need so sorely!

Finally, think how gracious the offer! “…that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.” Whosoever believeth! Any sinner may have this gift by simply believing, accepting in simple faith what God says about Christ paying for our sins at Calvary. In fact, this is the only way we can become the recipients of this wonderful gift, for Rom. 4:5 declares:

“But to him that worketh not, but believeth on Him that justifieth the ungodly, his faith [believing] is counted for righteousness.”


Share Article:   

To the Reader:
Some of our Two Minutes articles were written many years ago. Rather than rewrite or date such articles, we have left them just as they were when first published. This, we felt, would add to the interest, especially since our readers understand that many of them first appeared as newspaper articles. We hope that you’ll agree that while some of the references in these articles are dated, the spiritual truths taught therein are timeless.